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The Irish Diaspora: Irish Visitors, Irish Émigrés, and Irish-Americans

posted May 11, 2011, 9:24 PM by Leslie Murdock   [ updated May 11, 2011, 9:27 PM ]
The Irish Diaspora:

Irish Visitors, Irish Émigrés, and Irish-Americans

William M. Chace

Professor Emeritus, Stanford University

Sunday, May 22nd, 4pm

United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco

The Irish Literary & Historical Society is pleased to present as guest speaker William M. Chace, Emeritus Professor of English at Stanford University, at our meeting on Sunday May 22, at 4:00PM.  While everyone knows about the massive migration, over the years, of the Irish people to America, and while everyone knows about the ways in which the demographic realities of this continent have been shaped by that migration, questions abound:

  • The Irish come, but few return.  Why?
  • More Irish women than men have immigrated.  Why?
  • Today, as in the past, Irish writers have strongly given shape and definition to “English literature” but many of those writers, as well as other Irish artists, have chosen to live abroad and not in their native land.  Why?
  • If language defines the culture of a country, what is the fate of Irish as a language in Ireland?  And has that language been involved as part of the Irish Diaspora? 

In addition to serving as Emeritus Professor of English at Stanford University, Dr. Chace is also the former president of Wesleyan University and Emory University.  He is a James Joyce scholar and teaches courses on Joyce, W. B. Yeats and other Irish writers.   This event is free for ILHS members, $5 suggested donation for visitors.

 

Tony Bucher

President

www.ILHSsf.org

The Irish Literary & Historical Society of the SF Bay Area  is a 501(c)(3 non-profit  Tax ID 26-2921516


Keening and the Merry Wake:

Irish Rituals of lament

Mary McLaughlin,

 Musican and scholar

Sunday, May 1st, 4pm (New date)

United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco

The Irish Literary and Historical Society welcomes scholar and musician Mary McLaughlin on Sunday May 1st, at 4:00PM.  Ms. McLaughlin will focus on a topic with deep roots in ancient Ireland: the rituals of lament, and specifically keening. Keening has been in practice from the very early times of the Irish people, is descended from sacred songs of the distant past, and has evolved in sometimes uneasy co-existence with Christian rituals through the years.  To McLaughlin, the rosary and keening represent the perfect synthesis of Christian and pagan culture.  Actual records of early Irish rituals and song are non-existent, so historians like McLaughlin have had to make deductions from the first accounts available, such as those penned by English visitors to the Irish countryside in the 18th Century, and much later by the Irish Folklore Commission of the 1930s. 

McLaughlin is a singer-songwriter who is steeped in the Gaelic song tradition of Ireland.  She records, performs and teaches workshops in singing skills, performance technique and Gaelic song and culture. Today she directs the Cor Aingli, a Gaelic language Community Choir in Santa Cruz.  During the latter years of her education she pursued the academic study of music and ritual, and focused her Master’s thesis on Irish ritual chants and song.  This event is free for ILHS members, $5 suggested donation for visitors, also the UICC restaurant is open Sunday evening for dinner, reservations recommended.  

Tony Bucher

President

Save the Date:  Sunday May 22nd, 4pm, Guest Speaker Bill Chace Ph.D., Stanford University; The Irish Diaspora: Irish Visitors, Irish Emigres, and the Irish-Americans



February 25, 2011

THE IRISH IN THE 1930s: 

BUILDING THE NATION 

Dr. Emilie Pine 

Lecturer in Drama, University College Dublin 

Friday, February 25, 2011, 7:30 p.m. 

United Irish Cultural Center 

2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco 


The Irish Literary & Historical Society is pleased to welcome Dr. Emilie Pine, Lecturer in Drama, University College Dublin, and Visiting Irish Fulbright Scholar at the University of California, Berkeley. 

Dr. Pine will speak on the subject of her current research, The Irish in the 1930s, a decade when the new State was busy building itself both ideologically and physically. Through considering the built environment alongside the social and political culture, she believes, we can understand Ireland—and the Irish—in this period more clearly and deeply than before. 

Dr. Pine has published widely on Irish theatre and film, regularly reviews for Irish Theatre Magazine, and has contributed essays to various collections, including Irish Cultural Memory (2009) and Ireland in Focus: Film, Photography and Popular Culture (2009). Her book The Politics of Irish Memory: Performing Remembrance in Contemporary Irish Culture was published in November 2010 by Palgrave Macmillan. She is Assistant Editor of the Irish University Review. 

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Pine as guest speaker on February 25th. Her presentation will be followed by a Q&A and a social with coffee, tea, and traditional Irish breads.

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